Cast Iron

I love pizza. Or, pretty much anything that has most or all the components of pizza, such as a calzone. Today, I will be sharing my experience making calzones on the grill and some reasons why you might want to do this. About 50% of the time, you can see a ball of dough in my refrigerator resting, slowly rising, and developing great sourdough like flavors, waiting to be kneaded (pun intended).

I might bake a loaf of bread, na’an, pita, pizza, or flatbread. Once, I even made some cinnamon rolls with Nutella spread over the top. The recipe for the dough that I make varies slightly but our cast iron pizza recipe has a good one to start with.

This post will be similar to our post on how to season cast iron, but from a slightly different starting point and focus.

Here we will discuss the process by which the seasoning on a piece of cast iron cookware may be completely removed, followed by a guide on how to re-season the cookware with flaxseed oil.

How To Restore Cast Iron: First of all, why would you want to restore cast iron cookware?

I hear the question all the time: How old is my Wagner cast iron skillet? Is there a way to date my Wagner cast iron dutch oven? Or even my Griswold skillet?

It is not an easy answer and there are a few factors to consider. So, first off there is a line of demarcation for collectible cast iron cookware.

Roughly after 1960, the cast iron cookware that was made in the US is not considered a “collectible” item. It just means it the collectors don’t hold those pieces of cookware as high as the other pre-1960 pieces.

In this case, I won the auction for $12.05!

A great bargain if you ask me! “How much was the shipping?!” you say.

The shipping for the lot of 3 skillets was $15.85. Yep, the shipping cost more than the goods.

Each of the skillets was less than $10 a piece, they can pretty much last for a few lifetimes if you take care of them right.

I felt great about this deal overall.

This may be an exception as far as the pricing but I think if you lurk around and take your time while monitoring the auctions, you too can find a good deal.

Do you want to make some homemade pizza but you don’t have the “required” pizza stone?

Don’t worry!

Just make a Cast Iron Skillet Pizza instead.

There are a few alternatives to help you get your pizza fix without having the requisite pizza stone and we’ll discuss how to use a cast iron skillet or griddle.

So you’ve got yourself a new, nude piece of cast iron cookware and you’re ready to put a fresh coating of seasoning. In our previous post, we mentioned that really any type of fat will work, with vegetable oil or shortening being the most commonly used (due to their near-ubiquitous presence in modern kitchens).

However, in the past few years, rumors of excellent cast iron seasons using flaxseed oil have caught our ears, and we were anxious to try it out.

If you have not yet tried to totally strip and re-season a piece of cast iron, please consider the process…and check out this other post to provide some context about the process, benefits, and why one may consider stripping the existing seasoning.

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