I hear the question all the time: How old is my Wagner cast iron skillet? Is there a way to date my Wagner cast iron dutch oven? Or even my Griswold skillet?

It is not an easy answer and there are a few factors to consider. So, first off there is a line of demarcation for collectible cast iron cookware.

Roughly after 1960, the cast iron cookware that was made in the US is not considered a “collectible” item. It just means it the collectors don’t hold those pieces of cookware as high as the other pre-1960 pieces.

In this case, I won the auction for $12.05!

A great bargain if you ask me! “How much was the shipping?!” you say.

The shipping for the lot of 3 skillets was $15.85. Yep, the shipping cost more than the goods.

Each of the skillets was less than $10 a piece, they can pretty much last for a few lifetimes if you take care of them right.

I felt great about this deal overall.

This may be an exception as far as the pricing but I think if you lurk around and take your time while monitoring the auctions, you too can find a good deal.

Do you want to make some homemade pizza but you don't have the “required” pizza stone?

Don’t worry!

Just make a Cast Iron Skillet Pizza instead.

There are a few alternatives to help you get your pizza fix without having the requisite pizza stone and we’ll discuss how to use a cast iron skillet or griddle.

So you've got yourself a new, nude piece of cast iron cookware and you’re ready to put a fresh coating of seasoning. In our previous post, we mentioned that really any type of fat will work, with vegetable oil or shortening being the most commonly used (due to their near-ubiquitous presence in modern kitchens).

However, in the past few years, rumors of excellent cast iron seasons using flaxseed oil have caught our ears, and we were anxious to try it out.

If you have not yet tried to totally strip and re-season a piece of cast iron, please consider the process…and check out this other post to provide some context about the process, benefits, and why one may consider stripping the existing seasoning.

When the earliest white hunters and settlers came to Louisiana, one important piece of equipment they carried was a cast iron Dutch oven.
This highly practical cooking utensil was essential in the kit of even the lightest traveling adventurer in early America. In fact, long before Columbus began his quest of discovery, hunting parties around the world depended upon some form of the classic Dutch oven to handle a multitude of cooking chores.

One of the best ways to cook a steak if you can’t make it out to the grill is on a cast iron skillet. You can’t beat the sear from the massive surface area that the skillet provides.

It is really nice to cook over a live fire, whether is charcoal or a real stick burner, but if you’re limited and must stay indoors this method is the way to go. In fact, this method might be the preferred method if you’re in a pinch for time.

And, I would say this cast iron steak recipe would beat out a gas grill – sorry!

But you may as well broil your steaks if you’re going to use a gas grill (in most cases anyway), and there isn’t anything wrong with that but the point is that a gas grill is not ideal.